Top-Paying Allied Health Jobs

Allied healthcare jobs account for 60% of all healthcare jobs, with the remaining 40% split between medical, nursing, and pharmacy. Although allied healthcare occupations have fewer educational requirements than medical jobs, they are projected to pay more. Even better, you may expect fantastic job possibilities in the next decades. The occupations with the highest allied health pay are included below in our handy list of healthcare careers.

Highest paying jobs in allied healthcare

Athletic Trainers

Athletic Trainer
Athletic Trainer

Athletic trainers are trained to identify, treat, and prevent muscle and bone injuries and diseases. They can work in a variety of settings, including schools, universities, hospitals, and doctors’ offices. Some athletic trainers would rather work at a gym or for a professional sports club. Every professional athlete needs a trainer, but injuries impact people of all ages who participate in sports in any setting. 

Audiologists

When a patient has a hearing impairment, an audiologist can assist them. However, because our hearing impacts our balance, any issues in this area would require audiology treatment as well. Hearing loss is a common condition among the elderly, and since people are living longer than ever before, there’s no evidence that employment in this field will disappear anytime soon. 

Occupational Therapist

Occupational Therapist
Occupational Therapist

Patients with intellectually, physically, developmentally, socially or emotionally debilitating disorders are frequently seen by occupational therapists. Patients frequently struggle to complete tasks that are required in everyday life and at employment. Occupational therapists assist patients in improving, regaining, and developing these abilities. 

Diagnostic Medical Sonographers

Sonographers are in charge of assisting in the diagnosis of medical problems. They utilize sonography equipment to generate pictures that allow them to examine an issue more closely. It’s critical that they not only know how to operate the equipment, but also that they receive professional training on how to interpret the images they create. 

Health Information Technician

Medical records and health information technologists, often known as health information technicians, are responsible for organizing and managing patient records and other health data. These experts code, categorize and arrange information for insurance reimbursement, database registries, and patient medical histories using various categorization systems. Billing and coding programs are popular, and you may become a licensed health information technologist in as little as six months.  

Dental Hygienists

Dental Hygienist
Dental Hygienist

It’s crucial for a hygienist to both educate and treat patients. Day-to-day responsibilities include aiding with dental procedures and looking for illness symptoms. Long-term study shows, however, that oral health is connected to our overall well-being, making this a fascinating and possibly lucrative job option.

Orthotist and Prosthetists

Medical orthotists and prosthetists create medical devices such as prosthetic limbs, braces, and other medical and surgical aids. These devices are frequently manufactured to order, based on the patient’s unique requirements. Orthotists and prosthetists must undergo a one-year residency after receiving their Master’s degree before being licensed.