Considerations Before Pursuing Psychology Career

Are you wondering if psychology is your true destiny? Take a closer look at these considerations before committing to a psychologist job.

Psychology Career
Psychology Career

Postgraduate Degree Is Often Necessary

This might be the first thing to take into consideration when you decide on a psychology career. Though there is a huge number of entry-level jobs you can get with a bachelor’s degree, job opportunities and salaries may be limited. You will need a graduate degree if you want better job opportunities and higher pay. 

Research positions in clinical psychology often require a master’s degree. It is also the minimum requirement for many psychology jobs such as counseling psychology, industrial-organizational psychology, school psychology, social psychology, and health psychology. There are various job options for you as long as you put effort into education and training. 

So, first, determine how much you will need to enter the chosen field. Do you plan to attend graduate school? Ask yourself if you have the commitment and drive to earn a graduate degree.

Psychology Jobs Can Be Stressful

While careers in Psychology are rewarding, they can be challenging and emotionally draining. Frustration and burnout are typical in psychology professions, especially those who are in the mental health field. Psychologists’ stress can stem from many sources such as strict deadlines, irregular working hours, overloaded paperwork, and patients facing major life crises. 

Psychology Jobs Can Be Stressful
Psychology Jobs Can Be Stressful

Thus, having good stress management skills is essential to thriving in this field. That’s why you should consider taking advantage of courses in counseling and stress management that can help you deal with work-related tension. Don’t just focus on the basic coursework required by your program, you’d better find more about any hands-on experience, research, and volunteer opportunities in order to best prepare your future career.

Psychology Careers Require Passion

Obtaining a degree in Psychology is difficult and time-consuming, no matter what aspect you choose to study. That’s why you should feel excited and passionate about the field in order to successfully pursue it. Consider your own personal preferences and interests before you decide on your psychology major. You may want to follow a college degree or a career route because it looks like the most practical or financially rewarding option, however,  if you don’t enjoy the subject or the career itself, you probably shouldn’t major in psychology.

Psychology Careers Favor Those Who Are People-Oriented

Although not all Psychologist jobs involve counseling clients, nearly all of them need to connect and collaborate with others during their working days. Many graduates with a Psychology degree will work in the human services field, spending most of their time working in person with patients. If you enjoy working with others and truly want to help clients with their mental issues, a psychology major might be your right choice.

Psychology Careers Favor Those Who Are People-Oriented
Psychology Careers Favor Those Who Are People-Oriented

However, there is still a wide selection of career choices for those who are more of the solitary, independent type, and enjoy time working alone. Some mental health professions that are more research-focused and less people-oriented for them to choose from, include experimental research, industrial-organizational psychology, and engineering psychology.

Conclusion

While Psychology is a rewarding career choice, it may not be the best major for everyone. Even if you’ve had a lifelong passion for the subject, you need to make sure you ponder thoughtfully if you are well suited to all its job aspects.
And if you’ve already decided to pursue it with all your heart, then you’ll want to acquire the basic understanding before becoming a health psychologist.