Choosing To Be A Dentist As Your Career Path (Part 2)

Working as a dentist can bring major benefits as mentioned in our previous blog like job stability, flexible schedule, and good income earnings. Besides those undeniable rewards, the job itself has possible drawbacks in the way to become a real dentist. There will be a lot of time, money and effort spent during the training & practice process.

To examine further about being a dentist from part 1, we will go deeper into this topic with the discovery of expected drawbacks that being a dentist can bring back to applicants. Please like or share the blog if you find it helpful.

Downsides of of being a dentist

  • High effort in education training and practice

Following high school, you will spend at least 7-8 years in education to become a dentist. It is not required at every dental school to have a Bachelor’s degree to join dental school, but it is strongly encouraged, and most institutions no longer admit students who do not have one. So you’ll spend your first four years of university education getting a Bachelor’s degree in whichever field you choose. There is no designated major for dentistry school; nevertheless, the majority of pre-dental students major in Science.

Downsides of of being a dentist
Downsides of of being a dentist

You can become a dentist after graduating from dental school. To get additional experience and improve your clinical abilities as a general dentist, you can pursue post-graduate programs such as a one-year General Practice Residency or Advanced Education in General Dentistry. You can also choose to specialize in one of the disciplines of dentistry; these post-graduate programs need an additional 2-6 years of study, depending on the specialization, to finish.

  • Time & Cost Consuming in getting work experience

Most dentists work full-time, and some work evenings and weekends as well. The benefit of owning your own practice is the freedom it allows you to have in your schedule. You might work less than full-time and avoid working evenings and weekends, but most dentists do because of debt, expenditures, and so on. However, as a dentist, you are accountable for your patients’ oral healthcare and should be prepared to call an emergency line if they have a severe toothache even after working hours. You must offer a means for them to obtain therapy, therefore anticipate spending a significant amount of time outside of typical business hours treating and supporting patients.

Time & Cost Consuming in getting work experience
Time & Cost Consuming in getting work experience

Just as the costs of dentistry school are exorbitant, the costs of running a dental business are exorbitant as well. Dentists earn a decent living and have secure careers, but they do not earn as much as patients or the general public believe. The majority of the money never makes it into the dentist’s pockets. It is used to pay for supplies, employee wages, taxes, maintenance, insurance, CE courses, new equipment, and so on. Dental equipment is exorbitantly priced. Companies are always introducing new dental materials, tools, and equipment, and you are constantly under pressure to buy the most recent and best thing.

  • The mental issue from stress and daily pressure

There are several elements that add to the stress of being a dentist when treating patients. You spend the entire day working and concentrating in a tiny, restricted space. Your job is time-consuming and precise. Some patients have limited ability to open their mouths, others have tongues the size of car hoods, still others salivate or bleed like fire hoses, still others wince in pain at the sound of a drill, still others gag at the sight of a mouth mirror, still others pass out, and still others will throw up on you.

The mental issue from stress and daily pressure
The mental issue from stress and daily pressure

You have to stick to your timetable, which is also extremely exact, and one patient who arrives late or an unforeseen incident during treatment may cause major delays and kinks in your timetable, as well as a lot of unnecessary stress. You must be able to tolerate and cope with high levels of stress while also managing stress outside of dentistry.

  • Vulnerability to Infectious Diseases when exposing to customers
Vulnerability to Infectious Diseases when exposing to customers
Vulnerability to Infectious Diseases when exposing to customers

Every day, as a dentist, you are exposed to infections and infectious diseases while you treat patients. Patients will arrive with a cold or a contagious disease, and you will be at risk of contracting it as well. Dentists also use a variety of sharp tools, such as needles, scalpel blades, burs, and so on. If you get a needlestick or poke yourself with a sharp tool by mistake, you run the risk of getting a blood-borne disease like HIV or Hepatitis C. If this occurs, you become vulnerable to several potentially fatal illnesses. Although the chance of getting the disease is very low, it is nevertheless conceivable and has occurred, therefore it is a danger that a dentist confronts.